Tramp Press and the Reawakening of Dorothy Macardle

Cover to Macardle’s Dark Enchantment, published by Tramp Press: https://www.tramppress.com/product/available-now-for-pre-order-dark-enchantment/

I recently did a presentation on Dorothy Macardle’s Dark Enchantment for my Irish Literature class. To be honest, I chose the novel because it sounded cool and mysterious. When I finished the novel, I was worried I chose wrong. Not only was it not the seductive story of my imagination, but it was actually virtually impossible to find academic sources which discussed the novel directly. This was because the book had been out of print until 2019, when it was picked up by Tramp Press in their Recovered Voices Series.

While I was frustrated at the complication this fact added to my assignment, I was more interested in the work Tramp Press were doing to revive voices lost in the Irish canon. I had heard of the publishing house before but wasn’t aware of this particular project. I’m glad I chose this awkward novel, because it allowed me to come across the work that Tramp are doing. Marcardle was a voice that was lost to time. She was removed from the literary canon because of her gender and experimental take on storytelling. These features do not make her irrelevant in Irish literature, but rather a refreshing contrast to the more popular, mostly male, authors highlighted in the 20th Century Irish period.

You can read more about the work Tramp press do on their website: https://www.tramppress.com/about/. The guardian did a piece on the women who run the company, and their stance on sexism in the publishing industry: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/sep/28/sexists-need-not-apply-publisher-refuses-to-look-at-manuscripts-addressed-to-dear-sirs. I commend the work these women are doing in diversifying the Irish canon, and look forward to seeing what they come out with in the future.